Effect of the Antimicrobial Agents Addition on the Stability of Part-Baked Bread during Refrigerated Storage and on the Sensory Quality of Full-Baked Bread

Alejandra Carrillo-Meza, Rossana Altamirano-Fortoul, Maria Eugenia Bárcenas

Abstract


Part-baked bread (PBB) is a product which offers advantages to producers and consumers. The lower cost of refrigeration in comparison with freezing makes it an interesting option to preserve the PBB. The main problem of PBB stored in refrigeration is the mold occurrence on its surface. The addition of an antimicrobial agent in the formulation of PBB capable to delay the proliferation of mold would help to extend its useful life. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of potassium sorbate in comparison with calcium propionate on the number of microorganisms of PBB stored in refrigeration, as well as on the sensory quality of full-baked bread obtained from PBB. From the tests performed it was observed that there were no molds on the surface of PBB with antimicrobial agents during 28 days of storage at 5ºC, while molds were on control PBB at 15 days of storage. It was also found that calcium propionate (0.16% flour basis) was more effective than potassium sorbate (0.16% flour basis) on delaying microorganisms growing. Addition of antimicrobial agents did not affect significantly the sensory attributes of bread obtained from PBB. However, the addition of propionate caused a decrease on the specific volume of bread.


Keywords


calcium propionate, part-baked bread, potassium sorbate, refrigeration.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/jfr.v5n6p95

Copyright (c) 2016 Alejandra Carrillo-Meza, Rossana Altamirano-Fortoul, Maria Eugenia Bárcenas

Journal of Food Research   ISSN 1927-0887(Print)   ISSN 1927-0895(Online)  E-mail: jfr@ccsenet.org

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