University Students’ Perceptions of Teacher Effectiveness and Emotions in Lectures: The Role of Socio-cognitive Factors, and Academic Performance

Georgia Stephanou, Argyris Kyridis

Abstract


This study examined (a) students’ ability self-perceptions, perceptions of domain-difficulty, value beliefs, experienced emotions in lectures and performance in the courses taught by the perceived as extremely effective and ineffective teachers, (b) the role of ability self-perceptions, perceived domain-difficulty and value beliefs in the emotions, rating of teacher effectiveness and impact of perceived teacher effectiveness on emotions, and (c) the effects of the three sets of concepts on performance. The sample comprised of 410 Early Childhood Education female students. The results showed that ability self-perceptions, perceptions of domain-difficulty, value beliefs, experienced emotions in lectures and performance differed between the courses taught by the perceived effective and ineffective teachers, in favoring the effective teachers. Cognitive factors had positive effects on perceived teacher effectiveness, emotions and impact of teacher effectiveness on emotions. The three set of concepts, together, positively influenced performance, while their relative power varied between the two groups of teachers. 


Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/ies.v5n2p58

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International Education Studies ISSN 1913-9020 (Print), ISSN 1913-9039 (Online)

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