A Causal Analysis of the Sense of Community for High-rise Residents in Bangkok Metropolitan Area

Siriwan Rujibhong, Prapatpong Upala

Abstract


This multidisciplinary research focuses on investigating the environmental-psychological causality of the sense of community among high-rise housing's residents. The cross-sectional survey had been conducted in six different zones of Bangkok metropolitan area by employing the multi-stage sampling technique. Correspondingly, the 1,206 participants living in eighteen residential high-rises responded to the personal and environmental psychological (PEP) questionnaire, whereas, the physical conditions of the buildings were examined and evaluated by utilizing a non-participant observation along with the physical environmental (PE) assessment. The multiple linear regression analysis was a major approach applied for analyzing and endorsing the causal effects of the independent variables on the sense of community of the respondents, which was measured in a rating-scale type. The set of independent variables were classified into five categories, namely, (a) urban and community factors, (b) architectural factors, (c) personal attributes and dwelling behavioral factors, (d) personal psychological factors, and (e) environmental-psychological factors.

The predictive model identified ten determinants that significantly dominated the variance of the sense of community at the 95% confidence interval (significance level of .05). Regarding the final regression equation, it revealed that the communal character of the building, social capital and participation, mental health condition, relationship with neighbors, and privacy satisfaction were the factors that enhanced the high-rise residents' sense of community. On the contrary, population density, the defensible character of the building, the privacy-supportive character of the building, introvert personality of the residents, and the average of safety concern were the factors that negatively influence their sense of community.


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5539/ass.v13n10p137

Copyright (c) 2017 Siriwan Rujibhong, Prapatpong Upala

License URL: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Asian Social Science   ISSN 1911-2017 (Print)   ISSN 1911-2025 (Online)    Email: ass@ccsenet.org 

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