Wetland Utilization and Environmental Implications on the North and Southern Slopes of Mount Cameroon

Fidelis Orock Tanyi, Sunday Shende Kometa

Abstract


The need for a more rigorous fight against environmental degradation in general and wetland extinction in particular is important if we have to eradicate poverty and hunger by the year 2035. Wetlands in the north eastern and southern slopes of the Mount Cameroon region are plagued by two categories of threats (stressors) which are of natural and anthropogenic origin. Since April 2009, most of the inland wetlands environs are suffering from a severe plague that is causing the death of Colocasia esculenta the main food crop cultivated in the inland wetlands in the region. Using questionnaires, interviews, topographic and climatic maps and physico-chemical analysis the paper examines the spatial assessment of wetland exploitation, and also examines the cause of the wilting of the crop (Colocasia esculenta) cultivated in inland wetlands in the region. The ecological implication reveals that the annual decrease in the total input of rainfall is causing a gradual decline of wetlands in the region, particularly as this decrease is accompanied by a commensurate increase in the rate of evapotranspiration. Laboratory analysis revealed that Pythium myriotylum, a fungus-like micro organism is a contributing factor that is causing the wilting of Colocasia esculenta. Invasive plant species therefore pose a major threat to biodiversity and the high degree of wetland degradation relates to the absence of wetland sensitization programmes by the government, Municipal Councils, Traditional Councils, Chiefs, Quarter Heads and Non-Governmental Organisations.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/jas.v7n7p103

Journal of Agricultural Science ISSN 1916-9752 (Print) ISSN 1916-9760 (Online)

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