Effects of Self-Criticism and Its Relationship with Depression across Cultures

Ayano Yamaguchi, Min-Sun Kim

Abstract


The purpose of this study is to test the cross-cultural predictions of the associations between self-criticism and
depression. The participants consisted of 642 undergraduates - 200 of them studying in Japan, and 442 of them
studying in the United States (Las Vegas: 242; Hawaii: 200). The results indicated that independent
self-construal in the U.S. and Japan is negatively associated with comparative self-criticism, which bolstered
college students’ taking criticism personally and, in turn, contributed to a high level of depression among
participants. However, interdependent self-construal in Japan is positively associated with internalized
self-criticism, which bolstered college students’ taking criticism personally and, in turn, contributed to a high
level of depression among participants. Discussion of these results and their implications is provided, followed
by suggestions for future research on culture, self-criticism, the tendency to take criticism personally which leads
to high level of depression, and the interventions and implications of such research.


Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/ijps.v5n1p1

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International Journal of Psychological Studies   ISSN 1918-7211 (Print)   ISSN 1918-722X (Online)

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