Effects of Self-Criticism and Its Relationship with Depression across Cultures


  •  Ayano Yamaguchi    
  •  Min-Sun Kim    

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to test the cross-cultural predictions of the associations between self-criticism and
depression. The participants consisted of 642 undergraduates - 200 of them studying in Japan, and 442 of them
studying in the United States (Las Vegas: 242; Hawaii: 200). The results indicated that independent
self-construal in the U.S. and Japan is negatively associated with comparative self-criticism, which bolstered
college students’ taking criticism personally and, in turn, contributed to a high level of depression among
participants. However, interdependent self-construal in Japan is positively associated with internalized
self-criticism, which bolstered college students’ taking criticism personally and, in turn, contributed to a high
level of depression among participants. Discussion of these results and their implications is provided, followed
by suggestions for future research on culture, self-criticism, the tendency to take criticism personally which leads
to high level of depression, and the interventions and implications of such research.



This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
  • Issn(Print): 1918-7211
  • Issn(Onlne): 1918-722X
  • Started: 2009
  • Frequency: quarterly

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Journal Metrics

Google-based Impact Factor (2017): 8.48

h-index (January 2018): 24

i10-index (January 2018): 76

h5-index (January 2018): 13

h5-median(January 2018): 22

 

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