Explaining Differences in Learning Outcomes in Auditing Education - The Importance of Background Factors, Prior Knowledge and Intellectual Skills

Claus Holm, Niels Steenholdt

Abstract


In this paper we use a learner perspective on learning outcomes which reflects that some students taking accounting classes are also provided with on-the-job training in accounting firms. Hence knowledge about learning outcomes for different groups of students is essential information for educators as well as the accounting profession. This paper extends prior research on the role of declarative and procedural knowledge in performing auditing tasks. Measuring learning outcomes is a complex matter requiring sensible measures for both declarative knowledge (ability to verbalize pertinent facts or processes) and procedural knowledge (intellectual skills). The performance of 75 graduate accounting students representing both types of schema is examined. The findings suggest that differences in learning outcomes may be attributed to differences in student background and prior knowledge (auditing experience). The findings also suggest that the importance of prior knowledge is mitigated by the intellectual skills required for a particular task.

Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/res.v6n2p63

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Review of European Studies   ISSN 1918-7173 (Print)   ISSN 1918-7181 (Online)

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