Economic Aspects of Carbonates of the Albian Asu River Group in Tse-Kucha Near Yandev, Middle Benue Trough, Nigeria

Anthony Temidayo Bolarinwa, Sunday Ojochogwu Idakwo, Alege Tope Shade

Abstract


The limestone-shale sequence at Tse-Kucha belongs to the Albian Asu River Group deposited during the first marine transgressive cycle in the Benue Trough. They however vary compositionally in mineralogy and texturally from fine to coarse grained. The compositional disparities between the samples of the limestone imposes corresponding differences in their industrial utilization.

Assessment of the limestone suggested a wider range of industrial utilization beyond the present day application. For example, the highly calcitic limestone (60.04%) which is characterized by high CaO (43.8-53.3%) and low amount of MgO (0.44-1.06%) constitute suitable raw materials for the cement production, agriculture, metallurgical purification in blast furnace, lime manufacture, chalk, plaster and other filler applications. Apart from silica which varies from 2.1-10.0%, other impurities in the limestone are less than 1%.

In view of the critical need of limestone in more strategic sectors of the economy, such as, iron and steel, agriculture, metallurgical purification/processes in blast furnace, lime manufacture industries, it is recommended that Government should exercise control measures over their exploitation for less profitable ventures. High quality burnt bricks and polished rock slabs could adequately substitute for sandcrete blocks produced from cement, which in many cases unaffordable to the peasants in the community.

Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/jgg.v5n2p85

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Journal of Geography and Geology   ISSN 1916-9779 (Print)   ISSN 1916-9787 (Online)

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