Chronic Stress and Its Consequences on Subsequent Academic Achievement among Adolescents

Karin Schraml, Aleksander Perski, Giorgio Grossi, Irena Makower

Abstract


Chronic stress has been associated with severe stress-related symptoms not only among adults but also among adolescents. The aim of the study was to investigate if chronic stress has implications for adolescents’ academic achievement. 270 high school students answered a questionnaire on stress symptoms on two occasions, at the beginning and at the end of high school. Those who perceived severe stress symptoms at both time points finished high school with significantly worse final grades than those who reported experiencing stress at only one or none of the time points. The risk for chronic stress was increased among adolescents with low global self-esteem, who perceived high demands and reported their self-rated health to be poor and their sleep duration to be insufficient. The results suggest that the early prevention of chronic stress is critical since, if left untreated, it can have serious consequences on young people’s future health and career possibilities.


Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/jedp.v2n1p69

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Journal of Educational and Developmental Psychology   ISSN 1927-0526 (Print)   ISSN 1927-0534 (Online)

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