Endosulfan: Its Isomers and Metabolites in Commercially Aquatic Organisms from the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean

Gabycarmen Navarrete-Rodríguez, Cesáreo Landeros-Sánchez, Alejandra Soto-Estrada, María del Refugio Castañeda-Chavez, Fabiola Lango-Reynoso, Arturo Pérez-Vazquez, Iourii Nikolskii G.

Abstract


The organochlorine pesticide endosulfan is an insecticide and acaricide used on a variety of crops around the world. Its adverse effects on public health and aquatic biota have been widely documented in several studies, which are closely related to their primary route of exposure, by eating food contaminated with this compound. Therefore, it is necessary to concentrate the information in order to analyze and understand its impact on public health. The present objective is to review the characteristics of endosulfan, its isomers and their presence in aquatic organisms of commercial importance in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. The aquatic organisms involved were molluscs, crustaceans and fish. The highest concentrations of endosulfan have been detected in oysters, Crassostrea virginica, with a maximum value of 99.48±16.21 ng g-1. Although the use of this insecticide for pest control worldwide is prohibited, research conducted in the Gulf of México and Caribbean Sea indicate that it is still used, which will affect future public health and consumers.


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5539/jas.v8n1p8

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Journal of Agricultural Science   ISSN 1916-9752 (Print)   ISSN 1916-9760 (Online)  E-mail: jas@ccsenet.org

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