Treating Public Speaking Anxiety: A Comparison of Exposure and Video Self-Modeling


  •  Emily M. Bartholomay    
  •  Daniel Houlihan    

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effectiveness of video self-modeling (VSM) and exposure therapy in treating public speaking anxiety (PSA) in a college student. The study employed a single-subject A-B design with parametric variations. Two phases were utilized in this study: baseline (exposure therapy) and intervention (video self-modeling) with a one-month follow-up. Generalization probes were also employed to assess whether or not decreases in PSA would generalize to other settings. Results of this study indicate a significant decrease in self-report public speaking anxiety from both pre- to post-treatment as well as from baseline to exposure sessions. However, these results may be specific to public speaking anxiety, as other forms of anxiety (i.e., social anxiety) did not result in similar decreases. Results from a post-treatment survey indicated that the participant felt that the treatment was beneficial in reducing public speaking anxiety and increasing confidence, providing additional support for the treatment package.


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
  • Issn(Print): 1918-7211
  • Issn(Onlne): 1918-722X
  • Started: 2009
  • Frequency: quarterly

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Journal Metrics

Google-based Impact Factor (2017): 8.48

h-index (January 2018): 24

i10-index (January 2018): 76

h5-index (January 2018): 13

h5-median(January 2018): 22

 

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